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How to Reset Your Cannabis Tolerance

How to Reset Your Cannabis Tolerance

What is Weed Tolerance?

If you keep consuming the same amount of cannabis as you always have, but suddenly it’s not getting you high anymore, you have begun to build up a tolerance. 


So what is weed tolerance? If you regularly consume cannabis over time, your body will get used to the amount and begin to build up a resistance to it. This means you will have to continually take in more and more weed to get as high as you once did. This happens due to the fact that when THC binds with CB1 receptors in the brain frequently, the amount of CB1 receptors can be reduced over time, meaning that THC won’t affect you the same way it used to. 


There is no set time frame in which a tolerance will build up; it depends on your physical makeup, the strength of the cannabis products you use, and how frequently you use them. 


When Do You Need a Reset?

The most significant sign you may need to reset your tolerance is that you have to consume much more cannabis to get as high as you used to. This can be frustrating as it will take you more time, money, and weed to get the effect you’ve become accustomed to. 


Resetting your tolerance can also be a good way to check in with yourself and reign back your usage if need be. If you notice your cannabis usage and tolerance have increased exponentially or even gotten out of control, it could be a good time to consider taking a short break from cannabis.  



Why Reset Your Tolerance?

The biggest benefit that users report from resetting their tolerance is that they don’t need as much weed to get high. Using less cannabis can save you money over time and help you to be less dependent on it if that is important to you. 


Resetting Your Tolerance

Is it possible to get your tolerance back down to where it once was? The answer is yes. Over time CB1 receptors can recover and even return to their previous levels. So how can you lower your tolerance? There are a few tips for resetting your tolerance and keeping it in check: 

  • Take a T break- A T break is where you abstain from using cannabis products for a certain length of time (anywhere from a few days to two weeks) to try to regain CB1 receptors. This is the most common way cannabis users try to lower their tolerance; however, this may not be a viable choice for medical marijuana users. 
  • Be wary of your dosage- The less cannabis you use, the less likely you are to build up a tolerance, so consider keeping a close eye on your intake. 
  • Exercise before intake- Physical activity may be able to lower your tolerance level. By exercising before you use cannabis, you may be able to feel the same effects as you would have before without using as much. 
  • Don’t use cannabis as often- By cutting down on how often you use cannabis, you may be able to regain CB1 receptors without taking a complete T break. 
  • Use products higher in CBD- CBD doesn’t affect CB1 receptors in the same way that THC does, so consider using products with a higher CBD to THC ratio if taking a T break isn’t feasible for you. 
  • Consider switching strains- While this won’t be as effective as some of the methods above, switching strains could be a great way to find another cannabis product that could be effective for you. 
  • Try to increase your myrcene- While the evidence supporting this method is anecdotal, it could be worth a shot. Some internet users report that eating foods like mangoes, broccoli, and nuts, which increase myrcene levels in the body, can increase your body’s affinity for THC and heighten its effects. 

 

What About Withdrawal Symptoms?

If you are an avid cannabis user and choose to scale back your consumption or even take a T break, be prepared to experience withdrawal symptoms. Withdrawal happens when your body becomes used to the presence of a particular substance and alters its chemistry to function around that substance. When you reduce or remove the substance, your brain will begin to adjust, but you will go through withdrawal in the meantime. Some of the most common symptoms of withdrawal are:

  • Nausea or other stomach problems
  • Insomnia or fatigue
  • Dramatic shifts in mood
  • Reduced appetite
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Headaches
  • Particularly vivid dreams

As everyone’s body is unique, there is no way to know if you will experience withdrawal symptoms or what symptoms you will experience until you reduce your cannabis intake or take a T break. 


If you are going through withdrawal, make sure to get plenty of food, water, and rest. Try to get some light exercise, and lean on friends or family for support if necessary. 


 


It Could Be Your Cannabis

If you aren’t getting quite the kick you used to from your cannabis products, it could be due to the products themselves. Low-quality products, old products, or products that have been exposed to the elements will not be as effective as fresh, high-quality cannabis products. To prevent your weed from going bad, we recommend storing it sealed in a dark, room temperature place to avoid oxidization. 

 

 

Turn to Elyxr

Regardless of your weed tolerance, you need cannabis products that provide you with sound, consistent results. That’s where Elyxr comes in. We specialize in creating high-quality delta-8, delta-10, and THC-O products, so you know you’re getting the good stuff regardless of which cannabinoid you choose. Our lab-tested extracts are grown and processed in the United States in an FDA-approved facility, so you don’t have to worry about where your cannabis products come from. Shop our online store for carts, edibles, tinctures, flower, and more today. 

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